Spanish Elections 26J: The Challenges for Unidos Podemos

In this blog post Juan Carlos Monedero, co-founder of Podemos and Professor of Political Science at the Universidad Complutense de Madrid, reflects on the results of the Spanish elections on the 26th June, and their significance for the development of a counter-hegemonic politics. The blog was originally written in Spanish and translated by CURA’s Dr Mercè Cortina Oriol. The original version is copied at the bottom of the article.

The regime crisis identified in Spain since 2008 and the emergence of new political parties on both the right (Ciudadanos) and the left (Unidos Podemos) are a sign of a process that affects the entire European Union. The fight against the regime of 1978 (the year of the Spanish Constitution) that Unidos Podemos represents transcends the two poles that have  epitomized Spanish (and European) politics: on the one hand, those who want to change the postwar social contract taking the neoliberal precepts and the frame of adjustment and competitiveness (the right, the extreme right and, in a shameful fashion, the socialist international) and on the other, those who want to return to the situation prior to 2008. The original space for Podemos consists, beyond these poles, in finding an answer to the crisis of civilisation that the world is facing.

The inability of the neoliberal model in aggregating citizen demands while accomplishing the mandates of capitalist accumulation turns into a growing public disaffection, and a challenge to the authorization that the governments receive from elections. This inability is added to three inherent aspects of the neoliberal model: the rise of individualist values and the criticism of “the political”; the role of corruption, which acts in this deregulated model as a kind of lubricating system; and the supranational forms of management of global capitalism (which William I. Robinson has called the emerging transnational state). Institutional corruption exacerbates the idea of inequality and the distancing between citizens and political elites. The “transnational state”, agent of the logic of adjustments in the social state -the role that Troika is representing-, leads to a claim for greater national sovereignty. Hence the “natural” way out of the neoliberal crisis is some form of populism, that is, a challenge to the system of political representation and an appeal to the people as the constituent subject that demands the recovery of the social contract or the signing of a new one, more inclusive, one. That context explains in the EU the rise of the extreme right in many EU countries, the Brexit, as well as the 15-M movement in Spain or “Reclaim the Street” in Portugal. The difference is that in Spain, 15-M posed a story that appealed to the own diagnosis of the left –pointing at the political and economic elites as responsible of the crisis and set in motion processes that chased away xenophobia. This is where Podemos was born. And its electoral fate is closely linked to the management of that past.

The general elections in December 2015 were the verification of the breakdown of bipartisanship in Spain. The traditional transfer of votes between the rightwing (PP) and leftwing (PSOE) hegemonic parties no longer worked, and a new force, Podemos, was just 300,000 votes far from the Socialists. On the right, the emergence of Ciudadanos remained in fourth place. It failed to meet electoral expectations and was thus not able to carry out the function it was born to – to serve as a crutch to the two main parties of the regime of 1978. The novelty of the elections resulted in an institutional consternation. The inability to form a government called for new elections in June 2016. The bulk of the political discourse of all parties in the campaign focused on blaming the other formations for the need for new elections. The PP presented itself as the party of order and the recovery of a peaceful past against the current uncertainties. The PSOE returned to a leftist discourse that it had left behind when it ruled the country and reformed Article 135 of the Constitution to prioritise debt repayment over social spending. All the electoral polls were indicating that PSOE would be overtaken by Unidos Podemos, the alliance between Podemos and Izquierda Unida (the latter had won in the December election a million votes and just two seats[1], which facilitated the alliance and a replacement of its general secretariat by a younger person). The prospect of overtaking the PSOE, led to a conservative electoral campaign, amicable with the Socialist Party and aimed at retaining those votes that, supposedly, Unidos Podemos would take from the PSOE. The result, however, was not as expected. A million votes were lost between December and June, far from overtaking the PSOE who ended celebrating not having been relegated to the third place, despite achieving the worst result in their history.

Why did Unidos Podemos lose one million votes? There are several reasons. With the December elections and the failure to form a government, the “novelty factor” withered for much of the electorate. Many decided to return to abstention. Another factor was the withdrawal of the support by some Izquierda Unida voters (we could talk about more than 300,000 voters that abstained or even went to the PSOE), who were angered because of a poorly explained alliance that placed their leader in an unattractive place (the fifth in Madrid’s electoral circumscription[2]).  The withdrawal of the support by these voters might also be explained by the memory of denigrations when unity between Podemos and Izquierda Unida was not possible in the December elections, as well as the ideological moderation of the alliance in an attempt to please the social-democratic voter.

This moderation in the discourse of Unidos Podemos even led Pablo Iglesias to state that Zapatero, PSOE’s President of the Spanish Government from 2004 to 2011, had been the best President of Spain’s democratic era, despite the 15-M being born in opposition to the policies of Zapatero. Iglesias also defined himself as a social democrat. This is a moderate definition even for PSOE members, who declare themselves socialist. Finally, the six elections held during the two years that Podemos has existed, have led to exhaustion. In a context of continuous elections, the representative, media-oriented and hierarchical side of the party have prevailed, while leaving aside the more deliberative and horizontal side represented by “the circles”[3]. That is to say, the side that is more closely linked to the desire for change that the 15-M forged.

The difficulties in forming a government after the June elections re-emphasised the failure of bipartisanship, but also made it clear that the alternative needs more time than that marked by a naive belief in a “Blitzkrieg” fuelled by a regime crisis. Unidos Podemos has not yet resolved its ideological corpus, its territorial or its internal organisation. As long as Unidos Podemos leaves these problems unresolved it is not likely to be seen as potentially governing force that can deliver an alternative vision for the country. Following two years of continuous elections, it’s time to take a pause to look inward and think about how it can be a new-fangled political formation that responds to contemporary challenges such as the degradation of employment, the environmental crisis, the aging of population, the growing wars, consequent migrations, rising violence as well as social anomie in general. The old parties are not offering solutions here that are not worryingly reminiscent of the decade of the thirties of the last century.

[1] The difference between seats and votes is explained by the proportional system that defines the Electoral Law in Spain. The system is based on the D’Hondt Method in combination with a plurinominal circumscription model. (TN).

[2] The electoral system in Spain is based on a closed list model for each electoral circumscription. In Spain there are 52 circumscriptions for the case of the General Elections. (TN)

[3] “The circles” are the name that took the grassroots organizations within Podemos. These organizations take the form of local assemblies. (TN)

Juan Carlos Monedero is co-founder of Podemos and Professor of Political Science at the Universidad Complutense de Madrid. The blog was originally written in Spanish and translated by CURA’s Dr Mercè Cortina Oriol, with some help from Dr Adrian Bua. The original is copied in Spanish below.

La crisis de régimen que se identifica en España desde 2008, así como la irrupción de nuevas formaciones políticas tanto en la derecha -Ciudadanos- como en la izquierda -Unidos Podemos- son una señal de un proceso que afecta a toda la Unión Europea. La lucha que representa Unidos Podemos frente al régimen de 1978 (año de la Constitución) se coloca más allá de los dos polos que han resumido la política española (y europea): por un lado, los que quieren cambiar el contrato social de posguerra asumiendo los preceptos neoliberales y el marco de ajuste y competitividad (derecha, extrema derecha y, aunque de manera vergonzante, la internacional socialista) y por otro los que quieren regresar a la situación previa a 2008. El espacio original de Podemos consiste, más allá de estas impotencias, en encontrar una respuesta a la crisis de civilización que vive el mundo.

La incapacidad del modelo neoliberal de agregar demandas ciudadanas al tiempo que cumple con los mandatos de la acumulación capitalista se traduce, como es norma, en un crecimiento de la desafección ciudadana y una impugnación de la autorización para gobernar que reciben los gobiernos emanada de las elecciones. Esta incapacidad se suma a tres factores consustanciales al modelo: el auge de los valores Individualistas y la crítica a la “política”; el papel de la corrupción, que actúa en este modelo desrregulado como una suerte de lubricante del sistema; y las formas supranacionales de gestión del capitalismo global (lo que William I. Robinson ha llamado el emergente estado transnacional). La corrupción institucional exacerba la idea de desigualdad y el alejamiento de la ciudadanía respecto de las élites políticas. El “estado transnacional” agente de la lógica de los ajustes en el estado social -el papel que viene representando la Troika-, genera una reclamación de mayor soberanía nacional. De ahí que la salida “natural” a la crisis neoliberal sea alguna forma de populismo, esto es, una impugnación del sistema de representación política y una apelación al pueblo como sujeto constituyente que reclama la recuperación del contrato social o la firma de uno nuevo más inclusivo. Este marco es el que explica en la UE el auge de la extrema derecha o el Brexit, y también es el que da cuenta del movimiento 15-M en España o “Tomemos la calle” en Portugal. La diferencia estriba en que en España, el 15-M colocó un relato que apelaba al diagnóstico propio de la izquierda -culpaba a las élites políticas y económicas de la crisis- y puso en marcha procesos que ahuyentaron la xenofobia. De ahí es de donde nació Podemos. Y su suerte electoral está muy vinculada a la gestión que haga de ese pasado.

Las elecciones generales de diciembre de 2015 fueron la constatación de que el bipartidismo se había roto. El trasvase tradicional de votos entre el partido hegemónico de la derecha (PP) y el de la izquierda (PSOE) ya no funcionó y una nueva fuerza, Podemos, quedó apenas a 300.000 votos de los socialistas. Por la derecha, el surgimiento de Ciudadanos se quedó en una cuarta posición y lejos de las expectativas, por lo que no servía para lo que había nacido: servir de muleta a algunos de los dos grandes partidos del régimen de 1978. La novedad de las elecciones se tradujo en consternación Institucional. La incapacidad para formar gobierno convocó a nuevas elecciones en junio de 2016. El grueso del discurso político de todos los partidos en la campaña se centró en echar la culpa a las demás formaciones de la convocatoria de unas nuevas elecciones. El PP se ofrecía como el partido del orden y la recuperación de un pasado tranquilo frente a las incertidumbres. El PSOE regresaba al discurso izquierdista que abandonó cuando gobernó y reformó el artículo 135 de la Constitución para dar prioridad al pago de la deuda por encima del gasto social. Todas las encuestas señalaban el adelanto al PSOE por parte de Unidos Podemos (la alianza de Podemos e Izquierda Unida. Este último partido había obtenido en diciembre un millón de votos y solamente dos escaños, lo que facilitó la unión y un relevo en su secretaría general por una persona más joven), lo que llevó a una campaña electoral conservadora y amable con los socialistas dirigida a retener esos votos que, se suponía, se arrebataban al PSOE. El resultado, sin embargo, no fue el esperado, perdiendo respecto de las elecciones de diciembre un millón de votos y alejándose el “sorpasso” a los socialistas que, pese a obtener el peor resultado de su historia, celebraron como un triunfo no haber sido relegados al tercer puesto.

¿Por qué Unidos Podemos perdió un millón de votos? Las razones son varias. En las elecciones de diciembre se agotó para una parte del electorado el “factor novedad” de Podemos, que al no traducirse en gobierno decidieron regresar a la abstención. Fue importante la retirada de apoyo de una parte de los votantes de Izquierda Unida, enfadados por una alianza mal explicada que situaba a su líder en un lugar nada atractivo (el número cinco por Madrid). También influyó en estos sectores (podríamos hablar de más de 300.000 votos que se abstuvieron o votaron incluso al PSOE) la moderación ideológica a la búsqueda de contentar al votante socialdemócrata y la memoria de las descalificaciones cuando la unidad no fue posible en las elecciones de diciembre.

Esa moderación en el discurso de Unidos Podemos -Pablo Iglesias llegó a afirmar que Zapatero, del PSOE, había sido el mejor presidente de la democracia española, cuando el 15-M nació contra las políticas de Zapatero, o se definió como “socialdemócrata”, cuando esa definición es moderada incluso para los miembros del PSOE, que se definen como socialistas). Por último, seis elecciones en dos años -los de la existencia de Podemos- llevan al agotamiento, al tiempo que primaron la parte electoral, representativa, mediática y jerárquica del partido, que dejaba de lado la parte más deliberativo y horizontal que significan los círculos. Es decir, la más vinculada al deseo de cambio que marcó el 15-M.

Las dificultades para formar gobierno después de las elecciones de junio volvían a insistir en la quiebra del bipartidismo, pero también dejaban claro que la alternativa necesita más tiempo que el que marcaba una ingenua creencia en un Blitzkrieg alentado por la crisis del régimen. Unidos Podemos aún no ha resuelto ni su corpus ideológico ni su organización territorial ni su organización interna, y mientras que no cierre estos aspectos no parece probable que pueda ser vista como una fuerza de gobierno que porte una idea diferente de país.

Tras dos años de elección tras elección, le corresponde parar el balón, mirar hacia adentro y pensar cómo debe ser una formación política de nuevo cuño en el siglo XX que dé respuesta a la quiebra del mundo del trabajo, la crisis medioambiental, el envejecimiento de la población, las crecientes guerras y las consecuentes migraciones y aumento de la violencia y la anomia social. Aspectos para los que los viejos partidos no tienen solución que no recuerde inquietantemente a los años treinta del siglo pasado.

This entry was posted in Crises Resistance and Alternatives and tagged , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.